Change of time. Effective strategies to prevent disorders that may disrupt your daily routine – Health and Medicine

Change of time. Effective strategies to prevent disorders that may disrupt your daily routine - Health and Medicine



Whenever the calendar points to a new time change, there are many people experiencing some sort of disorder that affects their daily dynamics during the first few days after the transition. Tiredness, headaches, disorientation, anxiety, irritability, indigestion, stomach problems, insomnia and drowsiness during the day are just a few of the symptoms that disturb many people in times of changing schedules.

To combat them, there are several preventive strategies you can use, as you can see below:

– Get enough sleep in the days before the schedule change. If the body is more relaxed, it will be easier to adapt to the change.

– Lie down an hour before your usual time a few days before the change. Do it in a progressive way to get going.

– On the day of the change of time, stand up when your watch sets the usual wake-up time and goes out into the street. Let the sun indicate to your body that it is already daytime.

– Adapt your meal and sleep time as quickly as possible. The longer you delay, the more difficulty you will have. If you used to have lunch at one in the afternoon, keep this habit at the new time. The same applies at bedtime.

– If you feel drowsy and if you have the opportunity, consider taking a short nap, never more than 30 minutes. The healing effects of the siesta are well known, especially by the Spaniards, who do not live without it.

– Avoid caffeine and other stimulants. In the days leading up to the change and the first week thereafter, you should cut them off from your food.

– If you are in the habit of exercising, continue practicing it. If it's not your case, it's a good time to start. Many international studies argue that more active people are more likely to adapt to this change.



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