When hip-hop and electronics gain ground, will rock survive its farewell icons? – Showbiz

When hip-hop and electronics gain ground, will rock survive its farewell icons? - Showbiz



Dan Ozzi, a music critic for Vice magazine, wrote in 2018 an article titled "The Rock Died, Thank God," in which he stated that "the genre has been superseded at all levels in terms of popularity and profitability by pop , hip-hop and electronic music. "

Many industry figures call the 1990s the golden age of rock, with bands like Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden in the limelight.

For Danny Goldberg, a former Nirvana entrepreneur, hip-hop has become the "main vector of cultural expression of youth."

Jacqueline Warwick, a professor at the Canadian University of Dalhousie, believes that rock has long been considered the "serious artists" genre, but that idea is no longer true.

"Pop has hit the forefront of really interesting and important creative expressions," he explains. "And rock has become a kind of dinosaur," he added.

Deanna Adams, author of books on the subject, says that when idols die, "we mourn for the loss of their music, the concerts we can no longer see."

"There would not be metal, punk, or hip-hop without rock," he says. "Rock will not die because it is a broad and solid branch in a very old and robust tree," he says.

Some hip-hop stars do not hide their heritage of rock. For Ice Cube, one of the founding members of the Californian group N.W.A, rock "is not a musical genre, it's a state of mind."

"Rock is not about conforming to what's been done before, but about charting your own path in music and life," he declared in 2016, when the N.W.A entered the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.



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